DATA Report 2011

The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) released preliminary data for donor spending in 2010. ONE’s analysis of the new data (which focuses on sub-Saharan Africa and excludes bilateral debt relief) reveals that donors increased development assistance to sub-Saharan Africa by 12 percent in 2010, a sizable boost considering that global development assistance increased by only 7 percent.

All G8 members (excluding Russia, which does not report to the DAC) increased their spending in 2010, with large increases coming from France, Japan and the UK and smaller boosts from Canada and Italy.

Historic increases in development assistance have supported incredible progress in the world’s poorest countries over the past decade (a message that Bill and Melinda Gates are sharing across European capitals this week as part of ONE’s Living Proof Campaign). However, early indications suggest that increases from most donors will not be enough to meet the targets they set in 2005 to achieve by 2010.

ONE will be releasing its final assessment of the 2005 commitments in our annual DATA Report before the G8 Summit in France. This year’s report will also assess donors’ efforts to improve the effectiveness of their aid and leverage additional resources through innovative financing mechanisms. In the current economic climate, a focus on impact and innovation are critical to ensuring that every dollar of development assistance is maximized. The 2011 DATA Report will also examine development assistance commitments beyond 2010 and the role of new donors like Brazil, India and China, who are not members of the DAC but are becoming increasingly important partners for Africa.

See ONE’s full analysis of the new DAC data here and read more about individual donors’ performance:

  • The UK increased its development assistance to sub-Saharan Africa by 24 percent ($975 million) in 2010, bringing its total spending up to $5.06 billion.
  • The US increased its development assistance to sub-Saharan Africa by 8 percent ($671 million) in 2010, bringing its total spending up to $9.550.
  • France, this year’s G8 and G20 host, delivered a substantial increase of 45 percent (1.383 billion) in 2010. While the bulk of this increase reflects a dip in France’s spending in 2009 (due to some loan repayments), 2010 development assistance is still 19% above France’s 2008 levels.
  • Germany nearly flat-lined its development assistance to sub-Saharan in 2010, with an increase of 2 percent ($82 million). This small increase brings Germany’s spending to $3.432 billion, just barely above 2008 levels.
  • Canada increased its development assistance to sub-Saharan Africa by 20 percent ($315 million) in 2010, another increase that appears large because of a dip in 2009. Canada’s 2010 development assistance is actually slightly lower than its spending in 2008.
  • Japan delivered a sizeable increase of $821 million to sub-Saharan Africa in 2010, representing a 31 percent boost and bringing its total ODA to $3.346 billion.
  • EU countries continued to boost their development assistance to sub-Saharan Africa in 2010, delivering a combined 12 percent increase ($2.433 billion) to the continent in 2010. Excluding European members of the G8, Portugal, Luxembourg and the Netherlands were the only countries to increase development assistance to sub-Saharan Africa in 2010; Scandinavian and Benelux countries made small decreases and Spain, Austria and Ireland cut their development assistance more substantially.