Volunteers needed: Help us tell Congress to #ElectrifyAfrica

Volunteers needed: Help us tell Congress to #ElectrifyAfrica

Join

Join the fight against extreme poverty

By Olivia Elder, ONE Campaigns

About 7 out of 10 people in Sub-Saharan Africa don’t have reliable access to electricity.

Energy poverty means that women give birth in the dark, kids study under street lamps, and businesses struggle to thrive when power goes out. Nearly 100,000 people have asked Congress to step up to solve energy poverty and we need your help delivering that message.

ONE members have worked tirelessly for the past two years—you’ve written letters, you’ve signed petitions, and you’ve posted online. The Electrify Africa Act was recently reintroduced in Congress, and if passed, it will bring electricity to 50 million African citizens for the very first time. How can you help?

Congress needs to hear your voice to pass the bill.

Getting involved with ONE’s Electrify Africa campaign is simple and you could make a huge impact on the lives of millions of Africans.

If you haven’t done so already, sign the Electrify Africa petition. We want to deliver hard copies of this digital petition to members of Congress all around the nation, so that they can have physical proof that their constituents want to fight extreme poverty.

Waiter serving traditional Ethiopian food on a restaurant with light rays coming from the outside

We need several people to print out and deliver petition packs to their local congressional offices.

This year, our goal is to get petitions delivered to 300 congressional districts across the country, and we need your help to make this happen! If you act, they will listen. Tell Congress you want them to #ElectrifyAfrica.

Petition delivery is a great way to start your involvement with ONE. Still not convinced? Hear from these volunteers about their experience:

“I’ve been with ONE since 2004, [and] I have shown up for ONE on numerous missions. I got involved with ONE because I want to see the end of poverty in my lifetime. It infuriates me that people anywhere still live in fear and want. My favorite [tasks] are always visits to our elected officials offices.” — Dan

“I found out about a petition delivery in 2012 from the ONE Facebook page. There was a post about scheduled deliveries for a petition to renew commitments to PEPFAR and the Global Fund, and I made a humorous ‘what-are-we-chopped-liver’ type comment about how there was no delivery event scheduled for my Congressman. The RFD almost immediately commented back asking if I wanted to do it myself.  And before I knew it I was standing outside Sean Duffy’s office in the pouring rain clutching my folder with the petition inside. I have done two petition deliveries at Rep. Duffy’s office and a speaking engagement with the Marathon County Republican Party in an effort to get energy cards signed by Duffy’s biggest supporters. I enjoy the challenge of getting out of my comfort zone and being an engaged citizen.” — Sarah

Fill out this form if you’re interested in petition delivery—you can make your voice heard and help us #ElectrifyAfrica!

Join the fight against extreme poverty

By signing you agree to ONE’s privacy policy, including to the transfer of your information to ONE’s servers in the United States.

Do you want to stay informed about how you can help fight against extreme poverty?

Sign up to receive emails from ONE and join millions of people around the world taking action to end extreme poverty and preventable disease. We’ll only ever ask for your voice, not your money. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Privacy options
Are you sure? If you select 'Yes' we can let you know how you can make a difference. You can unsubscribe at any time.

By signing you agree to ONE's privacy policy, including to the transfer of your information to ONE.org's servers in the United States.

You agree to receive occasional updates about ONE’s campaigns. You can unsubscribe at any time.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines