Fact of the day: To curb poverty, we need to curb illicit financial flows

Fact of the day: To curb poverty, we need to curb illicit financial flows

This is the seventh in a series of 15 facts over 15 days that we will be sharing with you to get you up to speed on what’s at stake in 2015.

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According to Global Financial Integrity, developing and emerging economies lost $6.6 trillion in illicit financial flows from 2003 through 2012. During that period, illicit outflows increased at a staggering average rate of 9.4% per year—roughly twice as fast as global GDP, with sub-Saharan Africa particularly hard hit. To ensure that developing countries have access to adequate resources to combat poverty and preventable diseases, it is imperative that world leaders take strong measures to curb illicit financial flows.

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