Who run the world? Girls!

Who run the world? Girls!

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Join the fight against extreme poverty

International Day of the Girl is a day all about promoting girls’ rights, talking about the inequalities that still exist between girls and boys, and also celebrating the incredible things girls around the world are achieving.

Inspired by all of the powerful stories of girls empowerment we saw on International Day of the Girl, we decided to highlight four of our favorite strong girls of 2016!

Below are some outstanding girls we’ve had the pleasure to collaborate with over the last year!

Eva Tolange

On January 1st of this year, Eva wrote to ONE members, asking that we all do more to help end extreme poverty in her village – and every place like it around the world – by 2030. But she didn’t just write to all of you. She wrote a letter to President Obama, too.

And a few months later, he answered.

In a speech to the United Nations, President Obama said:

“And so today I say to Eva and hundreds of millions like you, we see you. We hear you. I’ve read your letter and we commit ourselves as nations as ONE world to the urgent work that must be done.”

Thanks for standing up for girls everywhere, Eva. And thanks for proving that one voice does make a difference – and does get heard!

Blessing Nwafor

When some of Africa’s biggest female artists came together in Johannesburg to write and record the ‘Strong Girl’ track for ONE, they visited the Makeba Centre for Girls to understand some of the challenges facing young women in South Africa today.

One of the girls they met was Blessing – a 14 year old with a talent for rapping and big ambitions to start a music career. The artists invited her to join them in the studio the next day and be part of the track – she wrote her own lyrics and instantly became an essential part of the Strong Girl family.

Blessing said: “In the townships of South Africa it’s hard for girls. There is poverty, abuse, and it’s difficult for girls to stand up for themselves. I know first-hand that poverty is sexist, and that our leaders have to do more to support girls and women. Because when they are allowed to reach their full potential, girls and women lift their families, communities and even whole countries out of poverty faster.”

Mercy & Elizabeth:

Best friends, and practically sisters, Mercy and Elizabeth met at a group they both go to in Kenya which aims to educate girls about sexual health and keep them free from HIV.

Both Mercy and Elizabeth have set out to achieve their dreams and promised to support each-other every step of the way.

After Mercy’s sister passed away from not having access to health facilities, Mercy knew from the bottom of her heart she wanted to become a nurse. Elizabeth’s dream, too, was inspired by her family. She wants to become a lawyer to reclaim the land her mother wasn’t legally allowed to inherit as a women. These two amazing girls want every girl in the world to pursue their ambitions and to stand up and fight for their dreams!

Inspired yet? Take a stand for girls and women by adding your name to our Poverty is Sexist open letter!

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