Bono and ONE Welcome Canada’s Continued Investment in Global AIDS Crisis

Canada meets the global call to help save lives in the fight against AIDS, TB, and malaria

OTTAWA — Today, the Canadian Government announced that it will increase its support for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB & Malaria. This pledge comes at a time when the world urgently needs to build on the progress achieved over the last 15 years to defeat preventable diseases.

Though the world has seen a dramatic decline in AIDS deaths and a huge increase in the number of people on treatment, that disease still infects 800 young women every day. Canada’s new commitment will help build the capacity of governments to fight these diseases while investing more of their own resources, which will help save over 790,000 lives by providing, approximately:

  • anti-retroviral treatment for 1.3 million people living with HIV;
  • treatment and care for 940,000 people suffering from tuberculosis; and
  • 37 million bed nets to protect children and families from malaria.

Bono, lead singer of U2 and Co-Founder of The ONE Campaign and (RED):

“Thank you Prime Minister Trudeau and thank you to the Canadian people for making this new commitment to the Global Fund and saving millions of lives. The fight against AIDS is a marathon, not a sprint, and some are growing weary — but not Canada. With strong legs and a stronger heart, you have shown once again that the world can count on Canada. This is a human race we have to win.”

Gayle Smith, President and CEO of The ONE Campaign:

“This is a huge win at a time when the world is distracted from the fact that we know how to beat the diseases but that we’re still not moving fast enough. Canada’s increase in funding sends a signal that will spur other donors to step up to win this fight.”

Stuart Hickox, Canada Director of The ONE Campaign:

“We welcome and applaud this investment, and this renewed and strengthened role for Canada in global health. This is a commitment that is supported by Canadian advocates and citizens who have been championing the importance of a robust Canadian commitment to the Global Fund, and by those across Canada who have not forgotten the toll of the AIDS crisis in this country and want to step up to save others.”

 

Ends –

 

Media Contacts:

Justin McAuley
Media Manager, ONE in Canada
[email protected]
+1 613 686 1546

Gayle Smith is in Biarritz for the G7 Summit and available for comment. For any media enquiries in Biarritz, please contact:

Ben Maitland – +44 (0) 7881 370 441
Charlotte Grignard – +33 62 24 10 041
Karoline Lerche – +49 (0)173 249 0094
Guadalupe de las Casas Escardo – +32 (0) 472 71 74 20

 

Notes to Editors:

About ONE

ONE is a global movement campaigning to end extreme poverty and preventable disease by 2030, so that everyone, everywhere can lead a life of dignity and opportunity. We are non-partisan and pressure governments to do more to fight extreme poverty and preventable disease, particularly in Africa, and empower citizens to hold their governments to account. Read more at www.one.org.

 

The Importance of Investing in the Global Fund

The Global Fund is calling on the world to step up the fight against HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria. We are just months away from a crucial moment in the fight against the diseases. In October 2019, President Macron will host the Global Fund’s Sixth Replenishment Conference in Lyon. This Replenishment seeks to raise at least US$14 billion to help save 16 million lives, avert 234 million infections and help the world get back on track to end these diseases. Of the at least US$14 billion, the Global Fund is calling on the private sector to mobilize at least US$1 billion to step up the fight.

Stepping up the fight should not be seen as a choice, but as the fulfilment of a promise. This moment presents us with an opportunity to take a massive step toward achieving Sustainable Development Goal 3: health and well-being for all. We have no time to waste and we are calling on the world to step up the fight. Now.

Ending the epidemics of HIV, tuberculosis and malaria by 2030 is within reach, but not yet fully in our grasp. With only 11 years left, we have no time to waste. We must continue to step up the fight.