Local farm, global connection

Ana Grande and Sue Lowe traveled with a group of Southern California ONE volunteers to visit Wild Willow Farm in San Diego to learn about local economies through sustainable farming. 

GOATS!

Almost 1 billion people across the globe go to bed hungry every night. To meet the needs of the world’s population, expected to reach 9 billion people by 2050, agriculture production will need to increase by at least 60 percent.

To explore this issue on a deeper level, ONE members in Southern California got together for a field trip last week to Wild Willow Farm, a 6-acre farm about one mile from the Mexican border in San Diego.

At the farm, we watched demonstrations on organic gardening, fed and petted the farm’s chickens and goats, and discovered how electricity helps with the production of the end products we see on our table.

Our ONE group had 12 members, five of which were middle school students from Albert Einstein Charter School in San Diego. Our amazing tour guides, Amber, James and Cat, showed us how to compost and use composting. They explained why they planted wild and native flowers – to attract the insects and wildlife needed to pollinate crops like cabbage, celery, carrots, beets and other summer veggies. These crops feed over 50 families through its community supported agriculture program.

ONEmembersFarming

We harvested celery, picked out weeds, fed the chickens, and raked goat poop all in one day – and saw the strategic ways the farm uses electricity to grow crops and irrigate the land.

We were exhausted but felt motivated by the deep understanding that we can emulate what we have at Wild Willow across the 26 countries ready for energy in sub-Saharan Africa.

There is a lot of soul in the farming community; our little glimpse into that world though was enough for us to feel the heartbeat, if only for a moment.

Matthew.Letter

Our day ended with us signing letters to Rep. Susan Davis (CA-53), our local member of Congress, to co-sponsor Electrify Africa (HR 2548), like the one above from Matthew. 

By powering agriculture in developing countries through electricity, we help support increased production of fruit, vegetables, meat and dairy products, processes, shelf-life and transport. These advances lead to more food in the market and higher incomes for farmers.

Special thank you to our tour guides at Wild Willow Farm!