Honesty Oscars 2014: Best Director

This week before the Academy Awards, February 24 to 28, ONE and Accountability Lab will unveil a category for our Honesty Oscars 2014, an award that honors not Hollywood films, but the creative work of activists and organizations that fight global corruption. Vote for your favorites, and we’ll announce the winners on Oscar night, Sunday, March 2. 

Today, we unveil the fourth category in ONE and Accountability Lab’s Honesty Oscars (see the first category here, the second and third): Best Director. Like the Academy Awards, this category honors leaders who have a clear vision, visualize the execution of that vision, and carry it out through the help of their talented crew. In this case, this vision is a world without corruption. Scroll through the five nominees, then vote for your favorite in the form below. Voting for this category closes Sunday, March 2, 6PM ET. 

Category #4: Best Director

1. Ory Okolloh

Okolloh is a Kenyan activist, lawyer and blogger who has solving accountability problems with innovative technology for years. She helped create Ushahidi, which began as a crowdsourced map of violence that has been repurposed to aid after natural disasters worldwide, and co-founded Mzalendo, a Kenyan parliamentary watchdog site.

2. Rakesh Rajani

Rajani is a Tanzanian civil-society leader whose contributions include Twaweza – a ten-year citizen-centered initiative attempting to give citizens the information they need to hold government accountable – and HakiElimu, which has mobilized grassroots in Tanzania around issues of democracy, governance, and quality of education.

3. Ellen Miller

Miller is from the Sunlight Foundation, an organization that works domestically in the US as well as internationally to make sure government data is open and available – to ensure it can be used – taking datasets to apps and sites that tell real stories.

4. Clare Short

Short is Chair of the Board of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative which set the standard of transparency for payments made to countries for natural resources, allowing accountability for revenues from natural resources.

5. Alice Brown

Brown is a civil rights advocate who sits on the board of Corruption Watch South Africa, who has focused on civil rights and social justice philanthropy and also on institution-building for civil society organizations, which helps Corruption Watch create a more engaged and active civil society space in South Africa.

Voting for this category is now closed.

Did we forget your favorite? Add it in the comments below! Come back tomorrow to check out the next set of nominees for “Best Picture.” 

About the Accountability Lab: We are an independent, project-driven “for purpose” organization that engages civil society to develop unique innovations that help hold governments accountable. The Lab currently works with citizens in Liberia and Nepal, but is inspired by the creative efforts of people and organizations around the world in the quest to share information that helps create more accountable societies.