Put transparency and accountability at the heart of the MDG 2.0 process

In 2000, the Millennium Declaration and subsequent agreement on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) effectively rallied the world around achieving a set of goals, aimed at reducing global poverty and improving the well-being of the world’s most vulnerable.

The MDGs provided a focus for the efforts and resources of governments, resulting in impressive progress towards some of the goals. Since 2000, more than 6 million Africans have started taking antiretroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS, 5.5 million lives have been saved because of increased access to and utilization of vaccines, and 50 million more children are in school.

Thirteen years after the Millennium Declaration, at least 60 developing countries are on track to reach the extreme poverty, gender equality, child mortality and water MDGs. The momentum and buy-in the MDGs fostered changed the face of development, and will continue to shape the world through the 2015 deadline and beyond.

The time has now come to put together the world’s next set of poverty-fighting goals. It’s a plan that we’ll have to stick to for the next few decades – so we need to make sure that the framework is right at the start. We need your help in ensuring that these goals include input from citizens in developing countries and abide by an open and transparent process.

Please sign our petition asking the planners – the UN High Level Panel of Eminent Persons (HLP), which includes Prime Minister Cameron, President Johnson-Sirleaf, and President Yudhoyono – to ensure that our goals to end poverty are accountable and transparent.

Sign the petition here.

We only have a few weeks to put this on their radars. They’ve already started drawing up an outline of the plan – which is due in May – so let’s catch them now, at the start of the process.

We’ve outlined our petition specifically in a new report that we’re sending to the HLP, which you can (and should) read here. The HLP is meeting in Monrovia, Liberia this week, and staff and local ONE members will be there to deliver it to these important decision-makers.

Your signatures – which we will deliver in mid-March – will help show the HLP how much support the world has for our petition. It’ll give them the extra push they need to make our goals a reality.

In the report (by ONE and 13 other organizations*), we call on all countries to commit to consistent and timely reporting on both the investments made in pursuit of the new goals and the results achieved. We are also calling for new investments in statistical capacity and open data systems to give citizens and policymakers ways to use relevant data to hold governments accountable for the money they spend and the results they achieve.

But what do we mean exactly by “open” and “transparent” and “accountable”? Basically, it means we all need to do a better and more timely job of tracking both the investments we are making toward achieving the new global development goals, and what results we are actually achieving. These recommendations will help to ensure that the power and potential of open information is harnessed to enable people to take charge of their own development.

With the technological advancements of the past decade, including the rapid growth of mobile technologies in developing countries, it is easier than ever to ensure that the new set of goals reflects the needs and priorities of citizens in developing countries.

The new global development goals should be decided in a transparent, open process, and be manageable, measurable, meaningful, and message-able. The MDGs helped catalyze some of the most important development advancements in history. This is the next chapter, and we have a chance to let citizens write it.

*Our partners for this action include the Center for Transparency and Accountability in Liberia (CENTAL), Development Initiatives, Fundar (Mexico), Global Witness, Global Movement for Budget Transparency, Accountability and Participation, Integrity Action, International Budget Partnership, Luta Hamutuk Institute (Timor Leste), Publish What You Fund, Publish What You Pay, Revenue Watch Institute, Transparency International, and W3C (Brazil).

Don’t delay. Click here to tell the High-Level Panel to ensure that the process is transparent and accountable.  We only have a short time to get our ask in, so act now!